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Letter to Editor:Stanwood Camano  News 

Paul would offer dose of fresh air as state rep

By Dean Enell South Whidbey

Dear Editor: Are you feeling we need some political relief — some integrity these days?

Well, hallelujah, we have the great opportunity to get an effective, facts-based doer in our corner as state representative this November. You know, someone that truly knows and values our educational system; he’s a high-level leader at our Skagit Valley College.

Someone who works with people across the aisle to create bridges

to get somewhere rather than entrenched walls.

Someone who wants to serve the public interest as opposed to some sort of trickle down scheme that refuses to trickle.

Someone who accepts the indisputable evidence that our climate is changing, on our watch, from our activities and it’s high time to actually do something about it.

Dave Paul is the guy with the credentials to make positive change. If you get a chance to meet him you’ll enjoy his facts-based approach,

be amazed that he actually listens, has an open mind and really answers questions and surprisingly volunteers to get some data and study complex issues before spouting some preconceived opinion.

Most importantly he will tackle the constant challenges and opportunities we face down the road with the new ideas and insight they demand. For a healthy and needed dose of fresh air, check out votedavepaul.com.

Letter to Editor:Stanwood Camano  News Hannold needs to give credit where due  By Rhonda Paulson Camano Island      Aug 13, 2018

Dear Editor: Island County Commissioner Rick Hannold takes credit for too much while giving credit to too few. Here are a

few examples:  Hannold claims he led Island County’s fight to keep multinational open-net fish farms away from Whidbey and Camano waters. This project had broad backing on both islands, and the ban of pen-net fish farming passed before he took office.

He takes credit for acquiring of all of Barnum Point. In the April 6, 2016, commissioners’ work session, Hannold was against the acquisition, stating, “I don’t think the county should be in the business of owning property.”

Confronted with the statement that the Camano community wanted action on this, his response was, “Well, the community wants us to but the community’s not willing to put up any money.” False. Friends of Camano Island Parks was at the forefront, working to obtain money for this project. And many Camano residents stepped up with donations.

During a meeting I attended, Hannold commented that Camano’s issues are due to the lack of Camano residents stepping up to work for resolutions. False, again. Many residents volunteer long hours and a great deal of effort, not to mention contributing money, to help protect and improve our island. These efforts aren’t hidden.

In a recent Stanwood/Camano News article, Hannold said, “Every time something comes up I say, ‘What about Camano?’”

What about Camano, indeed, when he wanted to remove the vaccination program from Island County Public Health and have WhidbeyHealth provide the service. Camano does not have a WhidbeyHealth facility. Eliminating the service in Public Health would have eliminated it from Camano Island.

We need a county commissioner who knows our island, understands its issues, and who doesn’t disregard those who are already working hard to find solutions.

Letter to Editor: S/CNews:  

by David Muga 2/6/18

Dear Editor: Kudos to the Stanwood Camano News for publishing an informative weekly summary of legislation passed in the Washington state legislature during the current 60-day legislative session, all of which will have a direct impact on the citizenry of this state if signed into law.

Included in the Jan. 30 summary was an account of how our state legislative representatives voted on the relevant bills, which allows voters to assess and hold accountable their local representatives.

Of the seven pieces of legislation reported on in this article (one House bill and six Senate bills), what was so obviously striking was the voting performance of Sen. Barbara Bailey on the Senate bills: on the banning of bump-fire stocks (used in the Las Vegas shooting); on extending the period for voter registration to same day (a democratic process enhancement); on a voting rights act providing more opportunity for minority participation in local elections (a democratic process enhancement); on state financial aid to pay for college (providing education for the neediest); on protection of underage youth for conversion therapy; and on preventing harassment, intimidation and bullying in public schools. Sen. Bailey voted no on each.

If this is the Republican outlook on social issues, how will we ever be able to move forward toward a more compassionate, democratic and social justice society?

Letter: Students’ walkout shows courage, leadership

  • By David Muga Camano Island  Mar 19, 2018

Dear Editor: I want to note and commend with deepest appreciation the Stanwood High School /Middle School students for their courageous demonstration on March 14 in pursuit of ending gun violence in schools and memorializing the students who died from gun violence in Parkland, Florida.

Their walkout and march to the highway was a demonstration of democracy in action at its best. Their action also demonstrated leadership on an issue that directly affects not only them, but millions of students across the nation.

Adults and parents in the Stanwood-Camano community should be proud of the students‘ leadership on this action. We should hope they will continue to lead and give voice around local, national and world events that will affect them.

 

 

 

Letter: Norway’s healthcare costs are different than ours 2/6/2018

  • By Roberta Jorgensen Camano Island​

Dear Editor: On a recent extended visit to Norway, we had a personal experience with the Norwegian healthcare system (a single-payer system) when a family member injured himself requiring wound care and stitches.

As it was the day after Christmas, a day when businesses and shops are closed in Norway, we went to the Bergen walk-in clinic. The care was excellent and professional and the wait time was minimal. In fact, I would have to say that the clinic was by far cleaner than any urgent care clinic I have visited in the United States. (Perhaps this helps to account for Norway’s extremely low rate of antibiotic-resistant staphylococcus (MRSA).

As self-paying American citizens, the bill for the entire visit came to $170.42. If we had been Norwegian citizens, we would have had a small co-payment ($20-$40, depending upon the exchange rate). Hospital care is free in Norway and physician visit co-pays are capped.

Compare the above charge in Norway with what the Everett Clinic, for example, lists as fees for its walk-in clinic. (I commend the clinic for actually putting its prices online.) The self-care fee for a visit to an Everett walk-in clinic ranges from $267.25 to $407.50 for a new patient or $181.25 to $266.75 for an established patient, with the caveat that “Complex visits may be billed at a higher level of service and cost.”

The cost comparison between a visit to a Norwegian clinic and to the Everett Clinic again raises the question of why healthcare is more expensive in the United States, where we have many uninsured and underinsured people amid multiple insurance companies, versus Norway, where every Norwegian citizen and immigrant receives healthcare coverage.

Considering the centrality of healthcare to its citizenry, it’s no wonder no Norwegian citizen would be interested in emigrating to the U.S.

 

Letter: Report on how our lawmakers vote is welcome: By David Muga Camano Island: 2/6/2018

Dear Editor: Kudos to the Stanwood Camano News for publishing an informative weekly summary of legislation passed in the Washington state legislature during the current 60-day legislative session, all of which will have a direct impact on the citizenry of this state if signed into law.

Included in the Jan. 30 summary was an account of how our state legislative representatives voted on the relevant bills, which allows voters to assess and hold accountable their local representatives.

Of the seven pieces of legislation reported on in this article (one House bill and six Senate bills), what was so obviously striking was the voting performance of Sen. Barbara Bailey on the Senate bills: on the banning of bump-fire stocks (used in the Las Vegas shooting); on extending the period for voter registration to same day (a democratic process enhancement); on a voting rights act providing more opportunity for minority participation in local elections (a democratic process enhancement); on state financial aid to pay for college (providing education for the neediest); on protection of underage youth for conversion therapy; and on preventing harassment, intimidation and bullying in public schools. Sen. Bailey voted no on each.

If this is the Republican outlook on social issues, how will we ever be able to move forward toward a more compassionate, democratic and social justice society?